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 Government of FSM,  Government of PNG,  Government of the Solomon Islands

The present submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf
('the Commission') is made by the Federated States of Micronesia, Papua New
Guinea and the Solomon Islands (hereinafter referred to collectively as ‘the three
coastal States’) pursuant to paragraph 8 of Article 76 of the 1982 United Nations
Convention on the Law of the Sea ('the Convention') in support of the establishment
by the three coastal States of the outer limits of the continental shelf that lie beyond

 Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of SPC

Available online|each book hold dvd

Call Number: [EL],550 SOP

Physical Description: various pagings ; 29 cm

 Capacity Building to Enable the Development of Adaptation Measures in Pacific Islands Countries,  Cook Islands (CBDAMPIC)

Specifically the Community Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment was conducted to make it possible for the people of Aitutaki to tell the CBDAMPIC project team what climate related

 SCBD

This document outlines the activities that the Secretariat plans to undertake to support the IYB. Some of these have already begun and others are in development. The paper includes suggestions as to actions that other partners may take to advance the celebrations of the IYB.
The end result of the IYB celebration will be action at various levels as a result of targeted "public awareness" campaigns in collaboration with a number of partners. A comprehensive

 The Smithsonian Institution

Reef coral collections from American Samoa are in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., and in the Hessisches Landesmuseum, Darmstadt, W. Germany. The author has a collection of 790 coral specimens for a total of 1547 items known to be from American Samoa.
A total of 177 species (including 3 species of non-scleractinian corals) belonging to 48 genera and subgenera (including the genera Millepora and Heliopora) known to date are listed with data as of frequency of occurrence and habitat.

Available online

 Elsevier

Sustainable development projects that were supposed to insure the future of the earth's biological inheritance are currently being criticized for compromising biodiversity. Drawing on sixteen months of fieldwork with one of Papua New Guinea's most remote societies, this paper argues that more productive conservation policies will emerge when indigenous activities
are viewed as disturbance and not as vehicles for establishing equilibrium with the environment. This research demonstrates that although the Hewa play a significant role in shaping

 American Samoa Government

The American Samoa Islands and its surrounding waters contain historical, cultural, and natural resources that must be protected, managed, controlled and preserved for the benefit of all people of the Territory and future generations. The protection of these traditionally valuable resources will enhance and increase fish abundance and size for future catch.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)

The Pacific Islands region is important for a great number of cetaceans (whales and dolphins), whether as a permanent habitat, a breeding ground or a migration corridor. Currently, more
than thirty species of whales and dolphins have been identified in this area.
The presence and diversity of cetaceans in our region has led to the development of whale watching, both on a commercial and recreational basis. Whale watching is defined as viewing

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

Estimates vary but Nauru has probably been occupied for at least 3000 years. Although the people are considered Micronesians. the island was probably discovered by different ethnic groups at different times - there are indications of both Melanesian and Polynesian influences - and their descendents combined to form today's ethnic Nauruans. The language of Nauru is unique and gives few hints of its origins. Traditional Nauru society
is matrilineal and is based on 12 tribal grouping.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

 JCIC-Heritage

In key organizations that experts and institutions in various fields involved in cultural heritage international cooperation to participate, the Secretariat National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Tokyo has entrusted management from the Agency for Cultural Affairs. And at the same time to promote network building and information sharing between the consortium members, we have a research and dissemination and awareness-raising activities related to cultural heritage international cooperation activities

1 copy

Call Number: VF 7147

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)

In preparation for the upcoming meeting of the Pacific Climate Change Roundtable (PCCR), to be held in Majuro in October, 2009, the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) commissioned a stocktake of the progress made in implementing the Pacific Islands Framework for Action on Climate Change (PIFACC) in terms of its principles and expected outcomes, with an emphasis on adaptation and the associated enabling environment.

 Fisheries Department

From Closer external and internal examinations,it is therefore conclude that the fish sampled was not caught from spear,gillnet or line and hook but maybe resulted from other means which can inflicted less external body damages such as 'ava niukini','bleach' or 'dynamite'(if postioned further away from the center of the blast).However,it was scientifically proved that fish at a distance of few hundred metres from the center of the blast can be killed by the impact of the underwater travel sound.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

 United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

Coastal areas and oceans are complex and fragile environments with many different functions linked to public health, food security, and other economic and social benefits. These are also decisive elements in the alleviation of poverty. Healthy estuarine, near-shore and oceanic systems provide cultural heritage, food, building materials, traditional livelihoods, tourism opportunities, transportation routes, storm protection, organisms for biotechnology and many more benefits that are frequently overlooked or abused.

Available electronically

 International Union for Nature Conservation (IUCN)

Bioenergy occupies a unique position at the nexus of energy, environment, climate change and rural development agendas. Consequently, bioenergy and biofuels in particular, have seen
record levels of support in the form of subsidies, mandates and investments as governments seek to maximize the perceived synergies between the various opportunities offered by bioenergy. Whilst it is true that well- planned bioenergy development can reduce greenhouse gas emissions from a range of sources, increase rural incomes, reduce waste, improve access

 IIED

Climate change poses a massive threat to development. The poorest populations of poor countries - the Least Developed Countries, Small Island Developing States, and the nations of Africa - face the concentrated challenge of tackling the worst of the impacts with the least capacity to do so. Clearly, adaptation to climate impacts must be seamlessly integrated into any development planning and policy. This four- step plan for mainstreaming climate change aims to fulfil that need.

 Ministry of Natural Resources,  Energy & Environment

Tuvalu is comprised of nine small islands, six of them being atoll islands (with lagoons) namely Nanumea, Nui, Vaitupu, Nukufetau, Funafuti, and Nukulaelae. The remaining three,
Nanumanga, Niutao and Niulakita are raised limestone reef islands. None of the islands are more than three metres above sea level, with the biggest island, Vaitupu, having a land area of just over 1000 acres. The total land area is approximately twenty-six square kilometres with a sea area of 900,000 square kilometres. During the pre-independence period, 1938 - 1978,

 Ministry of Environment Conservation and Meteorology

The report was commissioned at the end of May 2008 with delivery of the final product by end June 2008. As such, it has been
researched and written over a very compressed timeline. Considerable shortcomings and inconsistencies in data
needed to be tackled in this period, and so a rapid desk assessment approach was used with limited opportunity for peer review and feedback.

Available online|1 copy

Call Number: 333.72 PAC [EL]

Physical Description: 97 p.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)

There is now a consensus that there is a discernible human influence on global climate. The form these global changes will take in the Pacific is far less certain, but the most significant and more immediate consequences are likely to be related to changes in rainfall regimes and soil moisture budgets, prevailing winds (both speed and direction) and in regional and local sea levels and patterns of wave action.

Available online

Call Number: 341.7623[EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 982-04-0194-1

Physical Description: 84 p.

 United Nations

This paper aims to provide an overview of the existing policy framework, activities and coordinating arrangements in the area of UN inter-agency information exchange concerning environmental capacity building. It has been prepared for the Environmental Management Group (EMG) by an independent consultant who is familiar with UN information exchange networks concerning environmental capacity building that are operating within the United Nations.

 Victoria University of Wellington

This paper is concerned with integrating adaptation to climate change with local development in the context of a climate change mitigation project for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. It is argued that integration will enhance locally appropriate and sustainable outcomes necessary for effective forest conservation in the context of rural Vanuatu.