13 results
 Environment and Conservation Division-MELAD

Looking at pressures of development on freshwater, this article argues that the future survival of small island states and their societies also greatly depends on managing the impacts of development.

 Environment and Conservation Division-MELAD

This Strategy is a five-year framework, a guiding document to support the development and implementation of communication initiatives. Its overarching objective is to highlight the priority communications goals in terms of climate change and climate risk in Kiribati, and to provide mechanisms and resources to enhance and encourage collaboration and cooperation in these areas.

 Environment and Conservation Division-MELAD

The purpose of these regulations are to;

* establish a shark sanctuary in Kiribati water to ensure conservation of sharks

* protect the balance of the marine ecosystem include commercially important fish species and the health of marine habitats such as coral reefs

* help sustain and develop the economy of Kiribati from shark and marine-related ecotourism

 National Museum of Natural History

The very productive lagoon fisheries of Tarawa atoll changed greatly in recent decades as human development and intensive harvesting increased. Tarawa typifies the increasingly common condition of resource depletion and marine community structure change with expanding human activities and population growth. Fisheries-dependent reports have documented the change in fisher landings for nearly two decades. A comparison of fisheries-independent data collected during 1992-93 with data collected in 1977 allowed for documentation of large changes in important finfish resources in Tarawa Lagoon.

 Environment and Conservation Division-MELAD

This report is a result of a field work - it took an environmental and physical approach of the situation of Kiribati with the objectives to better understand the formation and recent evolution of sedimentary coasts, in particular tropical islands (Indian Ocean and Caribbean Sea archipelagos) and to analyze interrelations between physical processes and human development to determine the nature and extent of anthropogenic impacts, particularly in coral reef environments as well as to evaluate the exposure of islands to coastal hazards related to climate and climate change.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

Concise environmental legislative reviews of Pacific Island countries plus Tokelau. **Please submit new information or corrections as the reviews will be updated annually.**

 Environment and Conservation Division-MELAD
 Environment and Conservation Division-MELAD

The World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) is the most comprehensive global database of marine and terrestrial protected areas, updated on a monthly basis, and is one of the key global biodiversity data sets being widely used by scientists, businesses, governments, International secretariats and others to inform planning, policy decisions and management. The WDPA is a joint project between UN Environment and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

Various training and reference materials from the ACPMEA and Inform Joint Regional Meeting held at SPREP 17-21 September 2018.

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 Environment and Conservation Division-MELAD

Kiribati 20 year vision development plan known as the KV20. The KV20 is Kiribati’s long term development blueprint for the period 2016-2036.

 Environment and Conservation Division-MELAD

This is the Kiribati Integrated Environment Policy published in June 2013

 Environment and Conservation Division-MELAD

ICUN Redlist category for Kiribati

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This paper highlights the seriousness of the “biodiversity crisis” on atolls and the need to place greater research and conservation emphasis on atolls and other small island ecosystems. It is based on studies over the past twenty years conducted in the atolls of Tuvalu, Tokelau, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands and the Tuamotu Archipelago of French Polynesia. It stresses that atolls offer some of the greatest opportunities for integrated studies of simplified small-island ecosystems.