27 results

Time series data on the consumption of HCFCs and methal bromid in Kiribati submitted to Ozone Secretariat.

A .cvs format of the data in the excel sheet for easier and immediate reading and interpretation.

Each value represents the number of dumping events observed on fishing vessels during the period 2003-2015

general garbage oil spillage metal leakages chemicals

vegetation types within the mainland coastal region provinces

vegetation types for the provinces in the PNG highlands region

Data valid as of 09/04/2019

Most atoll ecosystems and a wide range of terrestrial and marine organisms, and genetic or cultivars varieties of
traditional food and other multi-purpose plants are declining in abundance and under threat of either “economic extinction” or extirpation and in need of some form of protection. The severity of the situation is greatest on those more urbanized atolls where both the biodiversity and the local knowledge of biodiversity are threatened.

*see R Thanman pdf report for more information*

Terrestrial and marine plants and animals that are rare, endangered or in short supply,
and in need of protection in the atolls of the Pacific Islands.

This excel file include four spreadsheets each representing a separate theme (EMG = Environmental Monitoring and Governance, IOE = Island and Ocean Ecosystems, CCR = Climate Change Resilience, WMPC = waste). Within each theme are the core national environment indicators (scrolling from left to right).

Raster data representing the mean levels of calcite in µmol/m3 for the surface water layer. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Marine data layers for present conditions were produced with climate data describing monthly averages for the period 2000–2014, obtained from pre-processed global ocean re-analyses combining satellite and in situ observations at regular two- and three-dimensional spatial grids.

Raster data representing the mean levels of current velocities in meters/second for the surface water layer. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Marine data layers for present conditions were produced with climate data describing monthly averages for the period 2000–2014, obtained from pre-processed global ocean re-analyses combining satellite and in situ observations at regular two- and three-dimensional spatial grids.

Raster data representing the mean levels of iron in µmol/m3 for the surface water layer. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Marine data layers for present conditions were produced with climate data describing monthly averages for the period 2000–2014, obtained from pre-processed global ocean re-analyses combining satellite and in situ observations at regular two- and three-dimensional spatial grids.

Raster data representing the mean levels of pH for the surface water layer. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Marine data layers for present conditions were produced with climate data describing monthly averages for the period 2000–2014, obtained from pre-processed global ocean re-analyses combining satellite and in situ observations at regular two- and three-dimensional spatial grids.

Raster data representing the mean levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in E/m2/year for the surface water layer. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Marine data layers for present conditions were produced with climate data describing monthly averages for the period 2000–2014, obtained from pre-processed global ocean re-analyses combining satellite and in situ observations at regular two- and three-dimensional spatial grids.

Metadata file for the GIS data (raster and shapefiles) for the global threats to coral reefs: acidification, future thermal stress, integrated future threats, and past thermal stress.